Security

You are currently browsing articles tagged Security.

In response to comments on my post about 1Password and cloud security, this is an update about other password managers and my way out. It is highly recommended that you read the previous post first to understand where I am going with this. I was looking for a password manager for a specific purpose, that is cloud sync ability with something that at least looks like true encryption without back doors, and my comments are written from that mindset.

Why I would not use Dropbox for my passwords

Or Google drive. Or Onedrive for that matter.

And note the “for my passwords” part of the sentence. It is not that I do not use such services, but I consider all of them as an insecure location. They are just to juicy a target for wrongdoers, both intelligence agencies and the other kind of cyber criminals.

About “Free” cloud services

Such as Facebook, or maybe Lastpass is a better example in this case. There is no free lunch. You are either a customer or a product. You are either the farmer or the pig. Pigs have no rights to privacy. And before you consider using any google-based service, read this: Street View cars slurping wi-fi. This case complex was for me the first warning that something was rotten in the house of google. And it has not become any better since. I guess the “Don’t be evil” company motto should have been a warning as well…

As such I would never install a password manager on an Android or IOS-based phone that contains passwords for other systems. They are way to easy to hack.

And just as a note, LastPass and LogMeOnce was not considered due to their lack of a desktop client.

KeePass

I have used KeePass in the past, but it is mostly a local solution only, and is therefore out of scope. At least initially. I am also slightly worried about the fact that it is free, as in free of charge. I have nothing against open source software, but for some needs I prefer to have access to someone to complain to if it all goes wrong. Someone who is paid to listen to my ails and complaints. That being said, KeePass is a nice product for local password management.

Keeper

Had a brief look at it, discovered it was dependent on java, uninstalled immediately. Also, at revisiting it seems to be “moving to the cloud”.

DashLane

A solid security policy. I ran the demo for some time, but the “Modern” UI was horrible, if not as horrible as the 1Password 6 beta. I wanted to like it, but after continuously having to click buttons two or three times for them to do anything, I gave up. I may re-test it in the future. This is sadly a complaint I have about most “Modern” UI applications, they do not respond to mouse clicks consistently. I also could not get the browser plugin to work properly in Vivaldi.

StickyPassword

This has been the best contender so far. I got as far as testing the synchronization, and I used it for the full trial period without a rage-uninstall. What actually stopped me from going for it in the end was it’s login dialog constantly popping up when I wasn’t trying to use it. It became a nuisance. I also did not like that it wants to run all the time, instead of when I actually want to use it. The chance of someone snagging access to it while walking by if I forgot to lock my screen is of course a danger, but primarily I stopped using it because it became irksome.

What I ended up doing

I stuck with what I had, a simple local-only password manager not to be named. Because the password manager itself is not important, as long as you have control of the data locally.  It is how to control the synchronization of data that is important. And as I do not really trust any of the “public cloud” alternatives, I decided to make my own. I installed Resilio Sync, a file synchronization application based on the BitTorrent protocol, and used it to keep my encrypted password store in sync across my computers.

This allows me to keep the data in sync and, to a certain degree, actually know where my data is physically located. It could still be hacked or intercepted of course, but that had to be a much more directed attack than the usual “lets  archive everything that was ever stored on dropbox in case we need it some time” behavior we have come to expect from the people who are supposedly working to keep the world “safe”. I may come across as rather paranoid in this post, but such are the times.

Print This Post Print This Post

Tags: ,

%d bloggers like this: